Antitrust Law Source
Gun jumping the Brazilian way

Gun jumping the Brazilian way

August 23, 2016

Gun jumping – coordination before merger clearance – isn’t just an American issue.  Jay and Andre Gilbert, a Brazilian competition attorney, discuss what happens in Brazil when parties work together prior to the approval of a merger – Brazil’s standards, potential fines and the penalties companies might be faced with when this happens.

Introduction to Brazilian antitrust enforcement

Introduction to Brazilian antitrust enforcement

August 18, 2016

Before the independence of CADE (the Administrative Council for Economic Defense), it could take months for Brazilian mergers to be approved. Jay talks to Brazilian competition attorney Andre Gilberto about how the Brazilian government improved the process for reviewing antitrust and merger cases, and what crimes can be criminally prosecuted and merger control.

Part three: Privacy Matters

Part three: Privacy Matters

August 8, 2016

Concluding our privacy matters series, Ryan Graham discusses recent class actions and gives an industry update.

Part two: Privacy matters

Part two: Privacy matters

July 29, 2016

Continuing with part two of this three-part series about privacy and data security, Ana Crawford gives an update on which federal agencies and states are dipping their toes in the dataprotection arena.

Part one: Privacy matters

Part one: Privacy matters

July 18, 2016

In this three-part series, Jay speaks with attorneys across Porter Wright’s departments and practices about privacy and data security. Today’s podcast begins with Christina Hultsch who talks about the options available for European Union companies to transfer data.

Consumer data breaches

Consumer data breaches

May 18, 2016

What happens if your personally identifiable information is stolen, but no harm has come to you…yet? Do the eyes of the court feel that simply the fear of harm warrants relief? Jay and Ryan Graham discuss the differing decisions to date and how things may evolve in the future.

Representative evidence – Good, bad? The Supreme Court speaks

Representative evidence – Good, bad? The Supreme Court speaks

April 20, 2016

As we’ve reported previously, Tyson was challenging the certification of a class of employees who sued for unpaid time related to donning and doffing protective gear. Jay discusses the implications of the Supreme Court’s allowance of representative evidence to prove classwide liability and how the Court’s ruling may (or may not) impact future class actions.

Are data breaches covered under insurance policies?

Are data breaches covered under insurance policies?

April 14, 2016

In defending against a class action case where patient information was found online for months without being secured, the insurance company was found to have a duty to defend the defendant, who held an insurance policy that covered the publication of patient information. The case, Travelers Indemnity vs. Portal Healthcare, is important because it’s one of the first decisions to rule on whether data breach litigation is covered under commercial insurance policies.

Big data and what can be done with it: Part three

Big data and what can be done with it: Part three

March 1, 2016

In our last installment of the big data podcast series (listen to part one and part two), Jay and Phil discuss how companies deal with data breaches. They talk about how consumer trust is vital and how customers may prepare in advance for these breaches. Finally, Phil shares three tips when it comes to using customers’ information for competitive advantage.

Big data and what can be done with it: Part two

Big data and what can be done with it: Part two

February 23, 2016

Continuing their conversation regarding big data, Phil and Jay discuss what companies should be doing with big data, how to figure out whether they are using it correctly and if there is a better way of doing it. How do companies place value on their data to make financial decisions?

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