Antitrust Law Source
NCAA’s legal woes: Antitrust challenges from student-athletes continue

NCAA’s legal woes: Antitrust challenges from student-athletes continue

June 24, 2020

The NCAA’s legal challenges regarding a student athlete’s ability to financially benefit from their name, image and likeness has ramped up. The league was hit with another class action antitrust lawsuit last week. The lawsuit comes on the heels of a decision by the Ninth Circuit affirming a bench trial victory by student-athletes. In that case, the District Court largely held that the NCAA’s rules prohibiting certain Grant-in-Aid payments to student-athletes violated the antitrust laws.

Jay Levine talks with Luke Fedlam, head of Porter Wright’s sports practice, about all of these issues. Luke provides a unique insight as he represents over 100 student athletes. As Jay and Luke explain, the issues involved have a labyrinth of complexities for the multi-billion dollar college athletics industry and for the athletes themselves.

Antitrust woes for Amazon, Part 2

Antitrust woes for Amazon, Part 2

September 23, 2015

Antitrust Law Source author Darcy Jalandoni and editor Jay Levine pick up their discussion of the antitrust issues facing Amazon. In this episode, they discuss the parties’ positions, the result of Amazon’s recent contract dispute with Hachette…and how authors, and ultimately how American literature, will publish in the future.

Antitrust woes for Amazon, Part 1

Antitrust woes for Amazon, Part 1

September 16, 2015

Since the Kindle was released in 2007, Amazon has become dominant in the e-publishing world. Amid its other legal battles over the last eight years, a dispute between authors, the traditional publishing industry and Amazon has been not so quietly brewing. Antitrust Law Source author Darcy Jalandoni and editor Jay Levine discuss some of the interesting twists and turns in the dispute, and what the next chapter holds. 

The importance of the state action exemption on state licensing boards

The importance of the state action exemption on state licensing boards

November 26, 2014

This podcast discussed the background and potential legal implications, particularly on state licensing boards, of North Carolina Board of Dental examiners v. Federal Trade Commission, argued before the U.S. Supreme Court last month and previously summarized here. Jay Levine and Darcy Jalandoni, members of Porter Wright's Antitrust Group, provide an overview of the state action doctrine at issue in the case, analyze possible outcomes and assess the potential repercussions of the Court's decision. In particular, Jay and Darcy discuss how the Courts decision may affect how states will choose to license and oversee professionals (including medical professionals) in the future.